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Gypsy Jazz
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Bohemian_Wanderer
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 12:13 pm    Post subject: Gypsy Jazz Reply with quote

There's Gypsy Jazz, don't forget!

Django Reinhardt is definately worth listening to, if you can get the live version (downloading online, I found it) of 'Minor Swing'... It's an amazing song.
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dan martin
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 4:08 pm    Post subject: re Reply with quote

I've really been getting to Romane. He's incredible. Gypsy jazz is definitely something I need to learn how to do.
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gruuvystrings



Joined: 04 Dec 2004
Posts: 1
Location: Oz

PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2004 3:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A group that i'm in is playing minor swing right now. There are like three guitars when we do it gets crazy. sounds awesome though and it a fun song to play. we are also playing caravan, which is another gypsy jazz song. i think duke ellington wrote it. it's a cool style though. Very Happy
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viet
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2004 2:01 pm    Post subject: need some help* Reply with quote

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hey, wat up?
I have been living in Vietnam for 2 years now therefore i do not have much contact with western musicians. I am in high school ( 12 grade) and I have a very important project to hand in about Django Reinhardt. I was wandering if someone could answer a few questions... It would help me out so much and also interest me.
These are some examples of questions:

1) What scales does Django use? Harmonies?
2) What role does Django have in setting the Mood of his songs?
3)What role does his specific guitar have in the original timbre of his songs?
4) What is the importance of rhythm in Gypsy Jazz style?

If you have a large knowledge about Django or Gyypsy Jazz in general please help me out. Thank you in advance!!
Wink
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dan martin
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2004 11:09 pm    Post subject: django Reply with quote

Hmmm, sounds to me like you're trying to cheat... You need to listen to Django and try to answer those questions for yourself. I understand it must be hard to find western music, but since you obviously have access to the internet, it shouldn't be too hard to find some samples. Check out itunes, or maybe the samples on www.cduniverse.com. I'll give you a hint: there are usually a minimum of two guitars in any Gypsy jazz group, and Django would be the one playing the melodies. The other guitars you will hear provide the rhythmic aspect that would otherwise be filled by a drumset. The whole concept of using scales to improvise is completely garbage, so throw away that idea. Django was musically illiterate, in which case he would probably not be able to tell you the proper names of the scales he used. Besides, up until the early 1960's, jazzers primarily thought in terms of arppeggios and passing notes to go between, not scales. This is all I can offer you. The rest, such as mood, you have to find out for yourself. Good luck.
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Robert Burton



Joined: 30 Nov 2004
Posts: 12
Location: Winnipeg Manitoba Canada

PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 8:04 pm    Post subject: Re: django Reply with quote

dan martin wrote:

The whole concept of using scales to improvise is completely garbage, so throw away that idea.


In this case of answering the "what scales is he using" you are completely right. But Everyone who is soloing in a jazz context uses scales. Scales are the back bone of all western music and most music in general. I know the ultimate goal is to learn it all so you can 'forget it' is a oft repeated mantra but to forget it before you learn it makes no sense.

Even if you don't know the name of what you are playing it doesn't mean you aren't playing it.

Here is an old adage "you can't hear what you don't know and you can't know what you can't hear"

A bit of circular reasoning I admit but it does address the myth of "self taught" and ''playing by ear''
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John Hall



Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 25

PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2004 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi!

If you dont know your scales you dont know much... To start hearing lines you got to have something to start with. Sure listening to great is good but when you are practicing you got to practice something. I dont say you should start playing scales over songs because it dont sounds good, often gets very boring. But being able to hear all the scales in your head then you can hear lines containing chords tones.

Scales are good to know!

Bless J
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newgrass
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 7:15 pm    Post subject: Re: need some help* Reply with quote

viet wrote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hey, wat up?
I have been living in Vietnam for 2 years now therefore i do not have much contact with western musicians. I am in high school ( 12 grade) and I have a very important project to hand in about Django Reinhardt. I was wandering if someone could answer a few questions... It would help me out so much and also interest me.
These are some examples of questions:

1) What scales does Django use? Harmonies?
2) What role does Django have in setting the Mood of his songs?
3)What role does his specific guitar have in the original timbre of his songs?
4) What is the importance of rhythm in Gypsy Jazz style?

If you have a large knowledge about Django or Gyypsy Jazz in general please help me out. Thank you in advance!!
Wink



Django used a combination of several scales. But primarily mixolydian mode and harmonic minor.
Django was the mood setter.
As far as guitar. I've heard it played on selmars, macaferris, and regular dreadnought martin cutaways with fishman problenders in it the way that john carlini plays. The guitar is the preference of the musician.
the rhythm is more important than the lead in gypsy jazz. Without the pulsating rhythm it wouldn't be gypsy.
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martunes
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 6:16 am    Post subject: jorgensen Reply with quote

Has anybody heard a new Django style record from John Jorgensen (sp?) Question
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Zivsim
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 7:47 am    Post subject: Try listening to Bireli Lagrene Reply with quote

Bireli was inspired by Django. He is far more sophisticated but you could still hear Django in his playing
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jperdue
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 2:37 pm    Post subject: jorgenson Reply with quote

John Jorgenson's latest is called Franco-American Swing. It is a great album. You should get it.John also has a video out "Intro to Gypsy Jazz Guitar".

Some related websites:

http://www.johnjorgenson.com/html/home.html
http://www.carbonize.com/clients/djangofest/jj.htm
http://www.acousticguitar.com/issues/ag139/feature139.html
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tranefollower
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2004 12:20 am    Post subject: Gypsy Jazz Reply with quote

In my opinion, django used more melodies & arpeggios than up and down scales... he had the ability to "color" the arpeggios with extensions and substitutions. True you do hear "harmonic minor" in his playing but I dont think it was viewed to him that way considering he was said to be more of a ear player than a musical theorist. I may be wrong but after transcribing some of his stuff, I can see that alot of his runs are arpeggio based as with much of the gypsy style soloing.
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eljazzer
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2005 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are many incredible gypsy jazz guitarists. Django's legacy not only lives on but is growing appreciably.
The new dvd called: "Bireli Lagrene & Friends Gipsy Project" has about 15 of the worlds best guitarist in that genre(it also includes Djangos's grandson).
It also shows Bireli at the Montreux Jazz Festival when he was 13 or so. Pure genius!
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2005 6:26 pm    Post subject: Re: django Reply with quote

many guitarists dedicated their life to gypsy music >check out bireli lagrene >jimmy rosenberg and his brothers as well.lenine. romane are great gypsy guitarists .gypsy music is for me influenced by eastern music (use of harmonic and diminish scale) >bireli is my favorite guitarist ,u ve got to listen to him and to sylvain luc as well
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eljazzer
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 30, 2005 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of my favourite in the style is: Angelo Debarre. The guy's phasing is so well put together.

He's a gypsy jazzer with a lot of theoretical knowledge. Combines the best of both worlds.

Hey!!! did anyone get the Bireli DVD yet. The most guitarists on any one DVD package ever Smile
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