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pickula



Joined: 13 Feb 2006
Posts: 78
Location: Scotland

PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 6:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"So, who is this "better" 18 year old that might come along? "

I don't know, but I do know this - he'll come along some day.
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!Mark!



Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Posts: 24

PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 7:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

me in 4 years time?
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jazznote



Joined: 10 May 2006
Posts: 82
Location: Switzerland

PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
According to the criteria which I've been trained to use when examining, I wouldn't give even John McLaughlin or Pat Martino 98% for a Grade 8.


IMHO we jazz players should not waste time to bother about this. it's NOT about music and in particular not about jazz. Smile

( i would recommend to forget about the training and give pat 120% Wink
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JakeJew



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 2190
Location: Boston, MA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder what Robert Johnson would have scored. How about Howlin Wolf...

Wes barely ever played on any tunes harder than "here's that rainy day" or anything

I understand the point of these exams when you're talking about high level/professional stuff

I guess let's just not forget that the real meat lies elsewhere! At least, that's how I see it
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pickula



Joined: 13 Feb 2006
Posts: 78
Location: Scotland

PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"I guess let's just not forget that the real meat lies elsewhere! At least, that's how I see it"

I couldn't agree more! I'm not promoting these exams or saying they are what it's all about, I'm just informing Mark what's there, and how it relates to the UK educational system. He raised the subject, I answered, I don't know why people are getting so worked up about it. Igiro asked how Bream would do and I answered him with the facts. If he finds the facts objectionable, I'm not necessarily disagreeing with him - I didn't invent the exams or write the rules for them, I'm merely saying what the exams consist of. WTF does it matter if Bream gets 97% or whatever? the point is - that's the highest mark available and he would get it, and the people who work with these exams would understand what such a score would mean - the precise scores are irrelevant, it's the differential between the top guys and the others that counts.

As regards whether you actually need these exams or not - yes if you want to work in the UK education system, and no if you don't. Again, don't shoot the messenger guys, I'm only telling you how it is, not suggesting that people who pass the things are any better or worse than people who don't, gimme a break huh? I'm a jazz guitarist too y'know, and I'm not looking to get into any arguments here!
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JakeJew



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 2190
Location: Boston, MA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pickula wrote:
"I guess let's just not forget that the real meat lies elsewhere! At least, that's how I see it"

I couldn't agree more! I'm not promoting these exams or saying they are what it's all about, I'm just informing Mark what's there, and how it relates to the UK educational system. He raised the subject, I answered, I don't know why people are getting so worked up about it. Igiro asked how Bream would do and I answered him with the facts. If he finds the facts objectionable, I'm not necessarily disagreeing with him - I didn't invent the exams or write the rules for them, I'm merely saying what the exams consist of. WTF does it matter if Bream gets 97% or whatever? the point is - that's the highest mark available and he would get it, and the people who work with these exams would understand what such a score would mean - the precise scores are irrelevant, it's the differential between the top guys and the others that counts.

As regards whether you actually need these exams or not - yes if you want to work in the UK education system, and no if you don't. Again, don't shoot the messenger guys, I'm only telling you how it is, not suggesting that people who pass the things are any better or worse than people who don't, gimme a break huh? I'm a jazz guitarist too y'know, and I'm not looking to get into any arguments here!

yeah but I said, i don't disagree with the exams, nor your presentation of the information
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pickula



Joined: 13 Feb 2006
Posts: 78
Location: Scotland

PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2006 1:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jake - I've got no quarrel with anything you said on either of the two threads where this subject has been raised, your comments have been both reasonable and humorous. Sorry to everyone who's contributed if I've allowed myself to get a bit defensive over this whole issue, I guess I need to follow Igiro's advice on the other thread and not take the whole thing too seriously.

I'll try in future not to get too heated up on this forum unless any of you guys ever dare to say a word against my local soccer team, in which case - no more mister nice guy!!!!!!!!


Laughing Laughing Laughing
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taylorseward



Joined: 04 Sep 2006
Posts: 18
Location: Richmond, VA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

19, playing for 8 years. Jazz Studies major at VCU, however I am proficient in classical too (I feel like I could pass the classical grade 8 as shown by the link in a previous post). The jazz scene in Richmond keeps growing every year as it seems that everyone wants to be a guitar major. I think the standards for getting into VCU are way too low, however, the increased competition only increases my work ethic.
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thing



Joined: 14 Nov 2006
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2006 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom knows me but for the benefit of everybody else, 50, been playing since the 60's. I'm a guitar teacher, work for the LEA (Local Education Authority for the US guys) during the day teaching guitar in schools. I teach classical to primary kids (grades 1 to 6 I think in the US) and then whatever to secondary kids, classical, electric, kazoo, castanet....

I was just a general gigging type guy until my 30's when I got into teaching, I did my grade 8 and did a music college teaching course, which is where I started. I started up a private practice which I still have and then I was asked to teach in schools (I have a 100% pass rate in my exam candidates which may have helped) and from there became an examiner for LCM. I retired from doing that last year because it tends to screw up a lot of weekends 3 times a year and now the kids have left home me and the better half enjoy our time off at weekends. Plus I'm a glider pilot and play golf, something has to give....

I have genuinely catholic tastes in music, and I think I've played just about every style going, that I can think of anyway. I love playing, to me it's about fun and expression. I really don't care what the gig is, whether it be acoustic folk, rock, dance, jazz, I'm just happy to play and see people enjoy themselves. If you can't play with a smile on your face then take up plumbing.
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tonyteech



Joined: 20 Nov 2006
Posts: 86
Location: E London

PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2006 11:51 pm    Post subject: My Situation Reply with quote

I have just said hallo on a thread which covers most of my situation I spent most of my misspent youth playing flamenco and trying to be a professional opera singer (which happened later)

My situation is as a totally private teacher I am happy at present doing this although even at my 60 plus years the phone sometimes goes to ask me to play piano jazz I have decided to go for this next year as a piano is usually provided and I can get myself to where the piano is

Being nearly blind I do not drive - this makes gigging a logistical nightmare
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surfrider



Joined: 04 Jun 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2006 3:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It has been close to 35 years since I picked up my first guitar. I am 48 and I live in Southern California. I have lived in Cincinnati, Kansas City, New York City, and Princeton, NJ, but the past 18 have been in SoCal.

Like most people my age in the US of A who have played guitar as long as I have, our education in the field is somewhat fragmented. I started out taking lessons at the age of 14 in a music shop in downtown Cincinnati. I used a basic Mel Bay guitar book. It showed where the notes were on a fretboard. Luckily, in the Cincinnati Public Schools and at the prep school that I attended I had music, so the Mel Bay book did not look like it was written in hieroglyphics. Those lessons lasted about a year and a half.

From age 16 to 18, I primarliy taught myself and had cousins and friends who also played. Therefore, the peer teaching was good. The playing was mostly rock, blues, r and b, and funk. Jazz was not on the radar. By that time I had an acoustic, classical, and an electric guitar.

Then jazz arrived on my radar screen. Fusion was the norm. Al Dimeola and John McLaughlin were "the" players, especially for those of us who were making the transition from rock/blues. When I was eighteen, I got the first two Jamey Aebersold LP play alongs (still have them) and tried working with them. I began taking lessons again during my senior year of high school with a guy named Lenny. He turned me on to the Carcassi classical method book. I still use it but I am no real expert. So there was my second round of instruction. I also playen in a couple of groups in high school.

One summer while working on Nantucket Island as a groundskeeper for a private estate, I met a guy named Peter Watrous. He taught me how the ii-V7-I progression worked. A couple of times a week at the price of $5 and a six pack, Watrous showed me how to find the key or tonal centers, scales, and turned me on to real jazz guitarists like Pat Martino and Kenny Burrell. Watrous eventually became a jazz critic for the New York Times.

The following summer I was fortunate to reacquaint myself with classical guitar music. My mother was a patron of the new Musical Arts Center in Cincinnati. Many of the instructors were graduates of the world renowned CCM. I took classical lessons for two summers with Amy Brucks and it was back to Carrcassi.

Then it was back to learning on my own which I did from about 1980 to 1989. Then I started working on my career as an artist and teacher. I sold all my gear except for the classical guitar. My marriage (now divorced) took time away from playing too.

Then, in the fall of 1999, after a ten year hiatus of not playing at all. I decided to get serious and bought a Gibson ES175. I started teaching myself. One day I drove to Redlands, California to take a lesson with Jody Fisher. He showed me a lot of stuff in that one lesson. However, he did not want to teach privately. I did purchase one of his books, which lead me to my next teacher whose picture was in it. It was Joe Diorio.

I would travel an hour and a half to Joe's place for private lessons for about two years. He is a wonderful man. He is a painter and sculptor in the same way I am a guitarist, so we had a lot of two way conversations about art, philosophy, spirituality, and yes we played some guitar. He really got me focused and help me hear sounds I have never heard. I have also attended the Stanford Jazz Workshop and took some "jazz theory lessons" with a SoCal musician Mr. Jan Hasman.

So where am I now? For the past three years, I have played in a jazz combo off and on. We called ourselves, Freeway Jam, afte the Jeff Beck tune and also because we scattered along various California freeway exits. Sadly, that ended this summer when our saxophone player was died in an accident. I also took a new job about sixty five miles away from my house and that means I just play on my own, woodshedding, doing scales, jamming with play-alongs, etc. As soon as I am settled again, I will form another group. I am always working at sight reading which I stink at.

I own several guitars, amps, and several gadgets, etc. ES175, ES137, Emperor Regent, Ibanez AF105FNT, Les Paul Studio, Stratocaster, Steinberger, which I use for all types of jam sessions and playing situations.

So, why the personal history? I noticed that some younger players are on this thread. I guess I wanted to show how this funny non orchestral instrument has played a major role in my life. Keep playing, no matter how fragmented your experience is. After all the travels, education, relationships, a marriage, raising a kid, teaching kids and adults, exhibiting and selling my artwork, paying a mortgage, car payments, deaths, births, accidents, joy, sadness, dogs howling, earthquakes trembling, tornadoes twisting, and hurricanes flooding, I still play. There is nothing like ending my day strumming my guitar.

Surf's up!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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hanni



Joined: 01 Sep 2006
Posts: 660
Location: germany

PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2006 4:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, you are all so good and perfect in playing guitar, i cant make a certificate because i must learn by my self from internet and books. It´s a bit hard to fond a line but it´s o.k. i wrote my first song last week (had lovepain and than i can write, write and write). Now i have to stop playing guitar for 2 weeks, we sing a concert with groovin valley gospel, there is a music teather but only for singing and performance he is also o.k. but infront of a concert he is very hard to us, we have to learn much lessons and songs in a very short time and if we dont do this he can hear it....grrr.... Evil or Very Mad i don´t like this (no time to play guitar) i also like to be a bit bad Twisted Evil in music. I think its good to get a nice jazzvoice.
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nezumi



Joined: 23 Sep 2006
Posts: 169

PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2006 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hello Hanni

where do you live in allmange?
My brother lived for a few years in Monchengladbach. Married a German girl.
Many German tourists come to my area for holidays. Last year I met a man who has come to Canada for over 20 years, every summer.
Your english is fairly good. Better than my german by far.
All I know is.....Monchengladbach lol

Please tell us about your gear.

nezumi
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hanni



Joined: 01 Sep 2006
Posts: 660
Location: germany

PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2006 10:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, Mönchengladbach is far away. I live in a small village 35km to Hannover and i also work in hannover as bookkeeper in a sales store (not as musican Laughing ). I start singing as little child 3 ore 4 years i dont know, long time ago. Flute with seven and clarinette with 13 one year later i play in a youth orchester and we go on tour to canada toronto. Whith 16 life, frinds and all change, to old for the youth orchester, leaving school and working. But i liked music so much so i was doing jazzdancing long time and singing again.
Now the guitar story: it was like a woman get a baby, so my guitar is my baby (i hope you understand). There was a bad guy with a guitar he drank much put the wrong strings on the guitar and that ruined the corpus, the guitar break. He gave the guitar to my father and sayed to him: He put this in the waste (my father is a piano player and he dont put a guitar in the waste) so the guitar was standing near his piano. If i visit t my father, i see this guitar, ask him and he told me this story. And i ask: can i have this guitar? Yes take it. So i take the guitar to a frind (he had a music studio) and he say no no no what this. And he helps me to repair this guitar its a "Framus Classic" handmade, and he told me thats an expensive and good one, the guy was stupid/drunken to throw this away. Now the thing was i dont understand anything from guitars, and my fingers Crying or Very sad get a knot in it, than i was looking to a guitar teacher and take an hour, but this was bääää....... Evil or Very Mad i was learning nothing. I told this to the frind with the studio and he say: learn by your self and learn wat you can, you wil understand more and more, ask at church they have good musicans. At church was no guitar teatcher, but now i´m a member of groofin valley gospel singers Laughing and they have a teatcher for singing and performance. Sometimes i visit gospel workshops, get the dates from internet www.gospelszene.de ore www.guitarspace.de . It seems there is no other way. Its not easy with no guitar teatcher, i have times dont want to play 2 weeks and longer and i must start again, now i know thats not good. It needs longer with no teatcher, but i hope to play jazz soon (singing black orpheus at groovin valley Laughing ) and try to play it on guitar. The first song is writen too. Percusion is my body with a bell on my leg (like the balade singers in the middleage). I must learn more englisch, hope not to write to much mistakes. Hanni
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jazzerchick



Joined: 31 Oct 2006
Posts: 968
Location: SanAntonio , Tx

PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2006 7:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hanni, That's a great guitar story. Good luck.
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