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re-learning how to read
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6string83



Joined: 09 Jan 2007
Posts: 123
Location: west midlands, UK

PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2008 1:24 pm    Post subject: re-learning how to read Reply with quote

ok so i have bought leavitt's modern guitar method books but am having a problem, first lesson is to read a c major scale. my problemis that i know how to play a c major scale and find myself playing it without reading the music properly. any ideas?
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MorganS



Joined: 13 Jun 2007
Posts: 371
Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2008 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The hardest part for me is following a sheet when I know the song.

I also have trouble with not paying attention to the sheet when reading. I love using my ear and finding what I think are the right notes and then compare them to the sheet.

I've been told just go slow and never let your eyes leave the paper. They say if you can read without looking away from the paper thats the best.

I'm interested in seeing what people have to say, because I need to improve on this also.

Morgan
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stratocasturbator



Joined: 17 Jan 2007
Posts: 286
Location: South Orange, NJ

PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2008 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was an ear player for several decades. I still occasionally fall back on the habit of playing the notes I'm hearing instead of what I'm reading (especially if I'm playing with someone else and get a little lost).

the answer is easy though: use a metronome. because it's somewhat counter-productive to only read the note value without including the time value of the note. if it's all quarter notes, then play quarter notes. then focus on reading the note on the appropriate beat. do this at slow speed and play very deliberately. if you keep at it, it will get easier... Cool
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Jake Hanlon



Joined: 11 Jul 2007
Posts: 525
Location: Nova Scotia

PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2008 3:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

one of the most important reading skills is learning to reconginzie and instantly produce patterns that occour in the music like major scales, triads, specific rhythms etc. If you don't need to read a major scale, then you're cutting out the middle man and you don't need to.

If you are into getting out of that, then don't rely on your known fingerings. Try reading it only with 2 strings or starting off your 4h finger
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jokron



Joined: 23 Aug 2005
Posts: 656
Location: Skelleftea, Sweden

PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2008 4:33 am    Post subject: Re: re-learning how to read Reply with quote

6string83 wrote:
ok so i have bought leavitt's modern guitar method books but am having a problem, first lesson is to read a c major scale. my problemis that i know how to play a c major scale and find myself playing it without reading the music properly. any ideas?


Well, Leavitt deals with that problem too...look at the reading studies at page 64 and 65...I doubt that you already know them lines...you have to read to be able to play them and you'll have to work your way through the 60 pages before that...

/Jokron
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stratocasturbator



Joined: 17 Jan 2007
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PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2008 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm working on melodic rhythms right now, as a matter of fact...great book, it's really helping my reading a lot...
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hanni



Joined: 01 Sep 2006
Posts: 660
Location: germany

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 2:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i learned playing along charts from a classic german guitar book (Heinz Teuchert book) and played a lot of celtic tunes, iīm not a classic player but every second guitar lesson i do is a classic lesson, that makes it easye to play along charts and yes i have my eyes on the chart, if i compare it with jazz than only the scales and musictheory is the same, the rest is like two different instruments, thinking in a classic fingering for all solos and for the rest more in a blues style with cords, if there are more than 3 bbb or 3 ### and a bass key, than itīs hard for me to play such a solo without cords, i need long for this and feel like a beginner
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jokron



Joined: 23 Aug 2005
Posts: 656
Location: Skelleftea, Sweden

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hanni wrote:
i learned playing along charts from a classic german guitar book (Heinz Teuchert book) and played a lot of celtic tunes, iīm not a classic player but every second guitar lesson i do is a classic lesson, that makes it easye to play along charts and yes i have my eyes on the chart, if i compare it with jazz than only the scales and musictheory is the same, the rest is like two different instruments, thinking in a classic fingering for all solos and for the rest more in a blues style with cords, if there are more than 3 bbb or 3 ### and a bass key, than itīs hard for me to play such a solo without cords, i need long for this and feel like a beginner


I think that Leavitt and Noad's book is a perfect combination...they say pretty much the same thing, but you review the material and learn to play both with pick and fingerstyle...

/Jokron
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hanni



Joined: 01 Sep 2006
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Location: germany

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 8:31 am    Post subject: Re: re-learning how to read Reply with quote

jokron wrote:
6string83 wrote:
ok so i have bought leavitt's modern guitar method books but am having a problem, first lesson is to read a c major scale. my problemis that i know how to play a c major scale and find myself playing it without reading the music properly. any ideas?


Well, Leavitt deals with that problem too...look at the reading studies at page 64 and 65...I doubt that you already know them lines...you have to read to be able to play them and you'll have to work your way through the 60 pages before that...

/Jokron


yes i think so, i had the leavitt book in my hand but i donīt bought it, i want to play the jody fisher book to the end, the thing with the chords makes me much busy at the moment ( find them in all keys and play them in all inversions), i use a lot of charts too and a musicschool book from the italian terra-musica school i download from the net, so the leavitt book have to wait Very Happy
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jokron



Joined: 23 Aug 2005
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Location: Skelleftea, Sweden

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

...and the most fun part lies ahead of you...imagine to pick up some sheetmusic made by J S Bach (especially his fugues), put them on a note stand and play the fantastic lines he created more than 400 years ago. Pick them up and incorporate them in your soloing...

You suddenly realize that since Bach made his "Das Wohltemperierte Klavier" we all have the same twelve tones to deal with and I'm shure of that you can pick up some amazing ideas to lines from classical music and use in your jazzimprovisations. Not to mention the nordic folkmusic...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aO0-Z72JQK0

/Jokron
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hanni



Joined: 01 Sep 2006
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Location: germany

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jokron wrote:
...and the most fun part lies ahead of you...imagine to pick up some sheetmusic made by J S Bach (especially his fugues), put them on a note stand and play the fantastic lines he created more than 400 years ago. Pick them up and incorporate them in your soloing...

You suddenly realize that since Bach made his "Das Wohltemperierte Klavier" we all have the same twelve tones to deal with and I'm shure of that you can pick up some amazing ideas to lines from classical music and use in your jazzimprovisations. Not to mention the nordic folkmusic...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aO0-Z72JQK0

/Jokron


you wrote that with bach in another tread and it is interesting to get through, i know only one nordic folk song, itīs called finnish folk song and itīs in one of my guitar books, maybe itīs a standard, do you have a link of good nordic folk songs? i understand a bit swedish and danish but i canīt speak it
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hanni



Joined: 01 Sep 2006
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PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Das Wohltemperiertes Klavier Band I

http://www.noten-klavier.de/noten/wohltemperiertes-klavier.htm
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Prof. O'Kaine



Joined: 09 Jun 2008
Posts: 14
Location: Miami Florida

PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2008 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My mentor, Professor Randall Dollahon (University of Miami's Frost school of music), has developed a brilliant way to teach reading. All of our students begin to learn reading in the ninth position. Meaning, that your first finger is on the eighth fret in your 4th finger reaches to the 12th. so, if you were to play a C major scale... all the notes that your second finger plays to be on the eighth fret. Naturally, that means there are only two notes on the b-string. The Leavitt book "melodic rhythms for guitar" is a great book to apply this approach to.
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MangoTango



Joined: 08 Sep 2008
Posts: 307
Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi everyone,

I'm starting to take reading seriously now having let myself down in a rehearsal Embarassed . The Leavitt book seems to be the standard; is it going to be too much for a beginning reader like me? Is there a better place to start? Or should I just take the plunge and see what comes of it?
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JakeJew



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 2190
Location: Boston, MA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MangoTango wrote:
Hi everyone,

I'm starting to take reading seriously now having let myself down in a rehearsal Embarassed . The Leavitt book seems to be the standard; is it going to be too much for a beginning reader like me? Is there a better place to start? Or should I just take the plunge and see what comes of it?


There are dozens of Leavitt books, I'm sure there is one that is good for your level. I use Leavitt books with my absolute beginner guitar students.

If your reading is pretty weak then trying to read simple melodies like irish jigs and fiddle tunes is great practice. I did that for a while. I found this site to be of great help: http://www.thesession.org/tunes/display/1766
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