PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum Index PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum
Jazz Guitar Discussion
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

I am total beginner, is that alright?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum Index -> The Emerging Guitar Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
sizla



Joined: 15 Apr 2009
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 12:10 pm    Post subject: I am total beginner, is that alright? Reply with quote

HI

I am hoping that this is the forum for a total jazz guitarist beginner?

I am into many styles---love many styles, which i hope will add flavour to my 'jazz' playing. I love flamenco, Blues, Bluegrass, Classical....etc

I would first like to ask. What is favourites type of guitar people who play jazz like?

Also right hand techniques. What is most common --I am not knowing . For example in flamenco the right hand is free for percussion and various techniques. I LOVE that and hate picks

Is it a mixture in Jazz

And I dont know whether to ask this here or another thread---this is first post. What is recommended i practice to get me started in Jazz guitar?

Presently--from yesterday in fact, I have created a soundtrack using these chords //Dmin7/Dmin7/Fmin7/Fmin7// and have been using both the Dorial scale over them and the Dmin7 Arpeggio

I noticed that using the Dorian scale over the two chords, some of the notes dont sound right on one of chords if you play then in wrong sequence. Why is that?
_________________
it dont mean a thing if it aint got that...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
qwfu



Joined: 07 Apr 2009
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A reply from another beginner while we wait for the experts. I expect to be corrected.

Quote:

Also right hand techniques. What is most common --I am not knowing . For example in flamenco the right hand is free for percussion and various techniques. I LOVE that and hate picks


From what I've seen up to this point, there are more people playing with a pick than with fingers, altough almost everyone can switch between the two when they need it, and there are many famous players who use fingers as their main picking means. When I had to choose (because I realized that I was wasting my time trying to master both with the limited amount of exercise I could do) I chose pick because I prefer close voiced chords and fast chromatic lines. For solos it is faster and has a shorter 'attack' phase, giving a tone that many consider nicer.

Fingerpicking would be best if you like to do fast arpeggios and to have more choice in the kind of chord you can do. In short, I guess there isn't a correct way, and it depends on the kind of music you would like to do. But you will find that most of the literature (methods, exercises, etc.) expect you to use a pick.



Quote:
And I dont know whether to ask this here or another thread---this is first post. What is recommended i practice to get me started in Jazz guitar?


I think you should choose what you would like to play, before you choose the practice to follow. For example, I've seen that beginners are often suggested to learn barre chords. While that helps if you want to start playing immediately and not get bored, I don't think it takes you anywhere if what you want to play is solo improvisation or chord melody.


Quote:
I noticed that using the Dorian scale over the two chords, some of the notes dont sound right on one of chords if you play then in wrong sequence. Why is that?


I assume you mean D Dorian. Then maybe you should use Fmaj7 instead of Fmin7. D dorian scale has the same notes of the C major scale, while Fmin7 contains Ab and Eb.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gorecki
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Oct 2005
Posts: 62518
Location: Davis, CA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Where qwfu is going here is basically correct.

But you would really want to go Dmin7, G7. This is the 2 - 5 of the C major scale (which D dorian is a part of). Dmin7, FMaj7 is a 2 - 4 and not really the basis of jazz. Not wrong have you, just the 2 - 5 is the nuts and bolts of jazz.

Also to make something completely clear. Dorian is not a scale. It is a mode of a scale. In this case D Dorian is the second mode of the C Major scale. So whether you're playing D Dorian or C Ionian (C Major), you're playing the exact same notes.

Some people have a hard time getting their head around mode but realistically they are very simple. Seven different starting points of the same scale...simple as that! Wink
_________________

Forums Admin for PlayJazzGuitar.com.

Do you know where all of your F'n B flats are?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Jazzie



Joined: 27 Sep 2009
Posts: 19
Location: US

PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey sizla,
Watch Joe Pass play. He plays with the fingers on his right hand and with that technique he can play chords, a bass line and a melody all at the same time. He has a great video where he teaches you how.

Search YouTube for "joe pass guitar lesson".
_________________
Jazz Pickups
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
lex_robben



Joined: 10 May 2010
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Tue May 11, 2010 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey sizla,

I'm assuming that you are either classically or flamenco trained? Another thing which you might like to do is to use both pick and fingers at the same time. The pick has a much better 'attack' that allows you to play faster and the fingers would allow you to play wider intervals, great for arpeggios. Brett Garsed is a famous fusion guitarist that springs to mind who uses this approach.

I totally agree with Gorecki with the 2-5 thing. But why not go for the whole 2-5-1 (Dm7, G7 then Cmaj7) instead? Whilst playing over Dm7 and G7 allows you to practise creating tension, the Cmaj7 allows you to practise resolving the tension. Creating and resolving tension are the key points to good jazz soloing.

And simply playing D minor arpeggio and D dorian mode over Dm7 might sound a bit boring. You could try other things to get some more interesting sounds e.g. try Fmaj7 arpeggio, G major triad, D minor blues...
For the G7 chord your options are many...I suggest learning the melodic minor scale (especially the 7th mode) which might be useful playing over this chord Smile
_________________
Lex Robben
For free jazz and blues guitar licks and lessons, visit my blog at http://www.shadowguitarist.co.uk
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
hobersmith



Joined: 28 May 2010
Posts: 18
Location: San Francisco, CA

PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Joe Pass is one of the greatest, he's technique is a little rough, in the sense that you can't compare it to flamenco players (Paco de Lucia) but that guy sure does know a lot of music.
_________________
http://flamencoguitarlesson.net/flamenco-rumba.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum Index -> The Emerging Guitar Forum All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group