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who was guitar's equivalent of Thelonius Monk?
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princeplanet



Joined: 28 May 2009
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 5:17 pm    Post subject: who was guitar's equivalent of Thelonius Monk? Reply with quote

Surely there was someone that you could say that about?
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greentone



Joined: 31 May 2008
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm? He'd have to have been pretty taciturn. Compositionally, he/she would have had to have changed music, yet his or her compositions would yet be widely utilized. The next generation of musicians would have had to have gone to this cat to seek knowledge, wisdom, and inspiration--a la Coltrane.

In terms of all characteristics, i.e., askew personality (misunderstood), compositions, musical legacy, etc., I'd pick Django Reinhart. Otherwise, I'd pick Charlie Christian, who--working with Monk at Minton's--helped create Bop out of Swing. Christian, who was lionized by the next generation of players (they would flock to him for insights) was a man of very few words. His legacy is indelible.

I'll still go with Reinhart, though.
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Jens



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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scofield?

Jens
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jazzerchick



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lenny Breau?
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steve



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jens wrote:
Scofield?

Jens


I'll go with him too. Comes in from a different angle, and very rhythmical. The stuff that drummers enjoy.
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randalljazz



Joined: 19 May 2009
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hmmm...someone who played like no one else in his time, whose playing is immediately recognizable, whose style influenced a generation or two that came after, who wrote distinct and wonderful tunes unlike others...wes?...
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Tung



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As far as actually pursuing the same path as Monk, harmonically and aesthetically, being adventurous with intervals and rhythm, it would have to be Sco and Frisell. these 2 guys pretty much started an approach to improv that is very similar to what Monk started, using dissonant intervals and going outside with an edgy angst to their lines.
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JakeJew



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think you can. I think there are very few (probably no) guitarists that have been influential to jazz musicians the way monk has.
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Jake Hanlon



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You have to go with someone recognized for a style in improvisation based strongly on melody and rhythm with harmony that is complex yet utilized in simple ways.

You need someone who wasn't instantly famous but was respected by his peers.

I go with Jim Hall, who didn't really break out into the scene as a famous player until the Bridge and all that came after that, into the 70's where as a leader he changed the shape of the instrument and had a huge impact on sound, feel, melody and composition of all guitarists that came after him.
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hermano_sol



Joined: 12 Nov 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jake Hanlon wrote:
You have to go with someone recognized for a style in improvisation based strongly on melody and rhythm with harmony that is complex yet utilized in simple ways.

You need someone who wasn't instantly famous but was respected by his peers.

I go with Jim Hall, who didn't really break out into the scene as a famous player until the Bridge and all that came after that, into the 70's where as a leader he changed the shape of the instrument and had a huge impact on sound, feel, melody and composition of all guitarists that came after him.


+1
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Generic Sobriquet



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Too vague and nonspecific a question. You have 9 people answering what "equivalent of" means to them in more than 9 different ways. Exactly what aspects or characteristics of Monk are you wanting to compare? Impact and influence on jazz, compositional approach, musical hallmarks and querks, persona...what?

(I'll go ahead and say that I think to wonder about equating his persona or personal life to someone else would be an absolutely stupid excercise. That goes for anyone, not just Monk.)
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Viper



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PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2009 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No jazz guitarist can touch Monk for his choice of hats. I supose Wes would come nearest with his flat hat.

Choice of appropriate headgear is an important descision for any jazz maestro. Lesser musicians look right prats (UK English) when they emulate the masters and wear, for example a leather skinny brim as did Ornette.

In a way it is a tribute to the modesty of guitarists that they do not go in for outlandish headgear. A counter example is the late Davy Graham who was generally considered to be a folk guitarist influenced by jazz who went slightly over the top.
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planetguy



Joined: 11 Dec 2008
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2009 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Too vague and nonspecific a question.


exactly my thoughts as well...and before even opening the thread.

headgear...funny stuff there viper!

we might also examine the soft shoe aspect of monk....really, what gtrt(s) have/had monk's cool approach to the the ol' "heel to toe" as he played???
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jamester



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 4:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JakeJew wrote:
I don't think you can. I think there are very few (probably no) guitarists that have been influential to jazz musicians the way monk has.

+1

Monk really had no equal, no matter how you slice it. In the same way that Jimi has no equal IMO...it goes beyond playing ability, professional accomplishments, influence etc. It is all those things and more, much more.

One Monk quality the guitar community seems to lack is playfullness; beyond Jim Hall and maybe Rosenwinkel these days, most jazz guitarists are so serious and "deep" or whatever...

What jazz guitarist is doing some corny magic trick while playing, or dancing around like a goof, or wearing those silly hats, in order to show us that jazz should still be fun...that its very tradition is steeped in partying and having a good time?
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Generic Sobriquet



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Er, playfulness, or some sort of mental illness or syndrome. You know, whatever.
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