PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum Index PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum
Jazz Guitar Discussion
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Excellent Newsletter Chris!

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum Index -> Hangout, Chat & Get to Know
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Gorecki
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Oct 2005
Posts: 62518
Location: Davis, CA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2005 4:11 pm    Post subject: Excellent Newsletter Chris! Reply with quote

I just thought I'd shout out how bang on and how much I agree with our hosts Nov 1st newsletter.

It was very open, honest and genuine. All of not particularly common aspects of society these days.

I truly appreciate the straight forward dialog manner of expressing many truths that common male ego will not express as openly.

I've always (well, once I understood) that 'talent' is a result, not a gift from a higher power. I preach, to acquire talent, a person needs to pay homage to the three P's, Practice, Persistence, Passion. Beyond that time is the only obstacle.

Thanks Chris!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
JakeJew



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 2190
Location: Boston, MA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2005 4:58 pm    Post subject: Re: Excellent Newsletter Chris! Reply with quote

Gorecki wrote:
I just thought I'd shout out how bang on and how much I agree with our hosts Nov 1st newsletter.

It was very open, honest and genuine. All of not particularly common aspects of society these days.

I truly appreciate the straight forward dialog manner of expressing many truths that common male ego will not express as openly.

I've always (well, once I understood) that 'talent' is a result, not a gift from a higher power. I preach, to acquire talent, a person needs to pay homage to the three P's, Practice, Persistence, Passion. Beyond that time is the only obstacle.

Thanks Chris!


I don't get the newsletter. Could you post it here?
_________________
"Inspiration may be a form of superconsciousness, or perhaps of subconciousness - I wouldn't know. But I am sure that it is the antithesis of self-consciousness." - Aaron Copland
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Gorecki
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Oct 2005
Posts: 62518
Location: Davis, CA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2005 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hopefully Chris won't mind.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Welcome to the November 1st edition of What's New At
PlayJazzGuitar.com.

First, deep apologies for no newsletter in the middle of October. I was
on tour in the UK and finding two minutes to sit down and put something
together just never entered the equation... However, I am back on track
now...

I would like to highly recommend some educational guitar DVDs from an
amazing new website www.allstarmusiclessons.com. My good friend Mike
Whittaker, a top notch session and touring keyboard player, has filmed
lessons from some of the best guitarists in Los Angeles and is now
making these fabulous videos available on his website. More DVDs will
be released in the upcoming weeks and months but right now you might
check out a DVD entitled "The Next Step" by Allen Hinds (a great player
who has played with Mary J Blige, Crusaders & Natalie Cole to name a
few). Allen is a world class player in the vein of Robben Ford, and
Scott Henderson. There is a video sample on the web page. Check it out
here

This week's article:
Natural Talent
By Jamie Andreas


---------------------------------

A guitarist is by nature an emotional sort of person. I mean, it's such
an emotional instrument, I think it attracts people of a highly
sensitive nature, who need to learn to play so they can express that
emotion, so it doesn't drive them crazy, perhaps!
Because of this, I think we can fall prey to a few psychological
conditions that make our progress as guitarists and musicians much more
difficult than it needs to be. One of these conditions is the chronic
mood of doubt, which manifests itself as the spoken or unspoken
question of "Do I have any Natural Talent for this? Can I learn to play
guitar? Am I kidding myself here, thinking I can learn to play like
these obviously talented players I hear, who make me feel so
inadequate?" Boy, I spent a lot of time feeling like that. I remember
listening to a Segovia recording of the Bach Bouree in Em, which I was
working on at the time. He played it so fast, and I was so struggling
to play it at even half that speed, that it put me in a serious state
of self doubt.

Well, I have learned a few things about this subject of "natural
talent", and I think they would be good and useful things to share with
the aspiring players out there.

You Too Can Be A Superhero!

My first insight into this "question" was when I observed how I reacted
to my first experience in taking lessons. I had taught myself guitar
for three months before I began formal lessons. I was practicing for 3
hours a day by myself, working out of a book called something like
"Teach Yourself Guitar the Easy Way". It was a pretty decent book, and
I learned first position notes, some chords and some songs. When I
started lessons, I started with Mel Bay # 2, and had a lot of
misconceptions cleared up, and started learning a world of things I had
no clue about, with the aid of a very good Jazz style teacher.

When I started lessons, I began to practice even more, 5 or 6 hours a
day. As a result of this, and because I did have some degree of
"natural talent" (which I will define later), I got pretty good pretty
fast. My teacher was amazed, and used to show me off to everybody, as I
had become his "star pupil". He would always say, "tell them how much
you practice."

Now the funny thing is, I would always lie about it, and tell them "oh,
2 hours a day". I didn't want them to know I practiced so much. I
thought "I don't want them to know how much I work at it, I'd rather
let them think I'm some kind of genius". I used to get really afraid
someone would realize how much I worked at it, then I'd just be like
everybody else.

Now, I do forgive myself for this character flaw, because I understand
why I felt this way. I grew up in a big family, and there was only so
much attention to go around (and being someone who would spend a lot of
time on stage in later life, I needed a whole lot, by nature). This was
the first time in my life I ever stood out at anything, and had people
pay so much attention to me, and make me feel special. It was a good
gig, and I didn't want to blow it by having them find out I'm just a
common slob like everybody else. No, I'm special. I just picked this
thing up, and got divinely inspired.

Besides, my fondest desire as a child was to be a super hero, like
Superman, or Spiderman. I'd even settle for Batman! This was the
closest I had come to fulfilling that career choice!

Learning What Being Special Really Means

As I began teaching, I got the opportunity to see large numbers of
people attempting to learn to play, and I started to really investigate
this idea of natural talent. Was there such a thing, and what were the
reasons some people got really good, and others did not. I saw many
people grapple with the challenges of learning to play, and I realized
that yes, I do have some natural talent, because many of these people
were having such a harder time than I did. But I also noticed another
interesting thing. A very good percentage of the people I was teaching
seemed to have at least as much talent as I did. Some maybe more. But
very few had the burning desire I had. Very few were practicing the
number of hours I did, even from the beginning. Very few seemed to have
the almost desperate need in their life for this thing we call playing
the guitar.

So I saw that there is literally a whole lot of natural talent around.
But there isn't a whole lot of love, dedication, and "hard work".

I started to see how immature, and downright incorrect my old way of
thinking was, when I was trying to be a Superhero. I began to realize
how beautiful a thing it was that someone would love and need something
as beautiful as playing the guitar, that they would give so much of
themselves to it. I certainly thought it was beautiful whenever I saw
my students do it, and I still do. I was beginning to see that love,
dedication, and hard work were the really "special" things. (Of course,
it has never felt like "work" to me. It is called "playing" the guitar,
isn't it?)

You Expect Me To Practice Only 5 Hours a Week!!??

It took me a while to understand why all people who said they wanted to
play the guitar didn't spend most of their day doing it. I remember
being in high school, and filling out the form for getting extra credit
for taking music lessons. Mine said you had to practice at least 5
hours a week to qualify. I raised my hand and said, "excuse me, I think
there's a mistake on mine. It says you only have to practice 5 hours a
week, shouldn't that be 5 hours a day." I couldn't understand the
concept of only practicing 5 hours a week! Boy, did I learn different
when I started teaching full time!

Now as the years have gone by, I have become much more tolerant. I can
accept the fact that there are people in this world who want to play
the guitar, and yet only want to practice maybe a half an hour a day,
or whatever. I also realized that these are the people who are probably
not planning on becoming professionals, and that's okay. There is a
place in the world for people like this, although the world would
probably be a better place if more people spent most of their day
playing the guitar. But of course, professionals do need some people
who just like to listen, and admire how special we "full-timers" are.

In all seriousness though, I am always moved when I see so many people,
school teachers, landscapers, office workers, mothers and fathers, make
such a commitment to keep up their efforts to learn to play this
instrument, in the midst of otherwise very full and demanding lives.
Maybe they only get to practice 20 minutes a day, but it is very
important to them, and they make sacrifices to keep it in their lives
and have it grow. That's one reason I have made a specialty of showing
these people how to get the most out of the time they put in.

Okay, So What Is "Natural Talent"?

Natural Talent is a pre-disposition in the mind and the body, to do the
right thing. When a person who has natural talent for singing hears
someone sing, their body and mind "know" what that person is doing to
get that sound. And their body/mind knows how to do it too, or how to
begin moving in that direction. (They don't have to know this
consciously, that is "know what they know, and how they know it, they
just "know"). Some people come in for lessons, and they tend to do
everything right, from sitting comfortably with the instrument, to
positioning and using the fingers. Some people do everything wrong, and
must be shown, painstakingly and minutely, exactly what to do. These
people are the ones I have learned most from, about teaching and about
playing.

Understand that everyone falls somewhere in between the two extremes of
total cluelessness, and being a genius. Yes, I have some talent, as do
many people. If I didn't work really hard, it would have got me
nowhere. I needed a whole lot of education to go with that talent. So
did Beethoven, who studied with Haydn, and so did Bach, who spent his
life copying out the music of composers he admired, in order to study
their work. So did Eric Clapton, who spent years copying every blues
record he could find.

Don't Worry If You Think You Don't Have Any.

I have, as I said, some natural talent for guitar, but I sure don't
have it for singing. When it comes to singing, my head is on backwards.
Whatever the right thing to do is, I'll do the opposite. I don't need
"Singing For Dummies", I need "Singing for Retards!"

But guess what? I get paid every week now for singing, and people
compliment me all the time on my voice. That is because I tried my
hardest with many teachers over the years, and slowly began to "get
it". Not as fast as someone with natural talent, but I discovered how
to express myself with my voice, make a sound that was pleasing and not
ugly or strained, and fulfill my desire and need to sing. I also found
that I could move people with my singing, and transfer my emotion to
them, which is what music is all about.

And that is the good news. With the right approach, any one can learn
anything. I have proven this as far as playing the guitar goes, for
myself and for my students, many of whom have had their "heads on
backwards." In fact, the more you really try, the more "Natural Talent"
you will discover in yourself. It is like having a little voice in your
head guiding you in the right direction if you will listen. I have
found the more I listen, the louder that voice gets, and I hear it more
often.

Summing Up

Having "talent" is not the primary factor in whether or not you will
become a good or great player. Your burning desire and desperate need
to play, coupled with the correct understanding and approach, are the
most important things you must have.

There are lots of people with talent, but not a lot who allow their
desire to grow, and become powerful. If you can allow yourself to feel
this need and desire, and use the power of that to overcome all the
obstacles you might encounter along the way, you will find all the
talent you need to be the player you are meant to be.


About the author
Guitar virtuoso, recording artist, composer, and teacher of 30 years,
Jamie is recognized by music experts around the globe for her major
contribution to the advancement of guitar education. With a straight
forward writing style, her tried and true, result-oriented guitar book,
"The Principles of Correct Practice For Guitar", powerfully reveals the
correct practice methods that no other book has revealedtaking the
student from the beginning stages all the way to the highest levels of
virtuosity. Learn more at www.guitarprinciples.com.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
jokron



Joined: 23 Aug 2005
Posts: 656
Location: Skelleftea, Sweden

PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I thought it was nice too...especially as I'm a beginner on the subject I sometimes have thought, Hey, me, an middleage man, with the musical future behind me...learning to play Jazz on my guitar...do I have the talent? Do I have the time...? The article shurely made me throw those thoughts away...Yes I have a desire, a passion for learning how to play, and I will give it all the time I can manage...some weeks maybe just 5 hours, but now I'm getting up an hour earlier in the morning before I go to work to spend some time with my guitar...and in the evenings I use about at least half an hour...weekends a couple of hours a day...so the best of weeks 12-15 hours...and though I'm just in the beginning, I can see that I am developing from day to day...

...feels really good...

Very Happy

/Jan Olof
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gorecki
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Oct 2005
Posts: 62518
Location: Davis, CA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jokron wrote:

...feels really good...

Very Happy

/Jan Olof


Man, if even a few of my old students had your attitude, I'd probably still teach. Laughing Instead most only want to learn how to play that latest Green Day song on the radio. Rolling Eyes
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
JakeJew



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 2190
Location: Boston, MA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gorecki wrote:
jokron wrote:

...feels really good...

Very Happy

/Jan Olof


Man, if even a few of my old students had your attitude, I'd probably still teach. Laughing Instead most only want to learn how to play that latest Green Day song on the radio. Rolling Eyes


Sharing music is sharing music.
_________________
"Inspiration may be a form of superconsciousness, or perhaps of subconciousness - I wouldn't know. But I am sure that it is the antithesis of self-consciousness." - Aaron Copland
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
C. OSullivan



Joined: 20 Jun 2005
Posts: 176

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that it was Tim Berens who came up with this?

Ability = Natural Talent x Work

Good newsletter.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
PlayJazzGuitar



Joined: 11 Feb 2004
Posts: 114
Location: Los Angeles, CA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 8:20 pm    Post subject: Newsletter Reply with quote

Glad you guys liked that newsletter. For those of you who don't know, I send out one of these newsletters every two weeks. If you want to subscribe to it simply join as a member it's absolutely free. You can fill out that really annoying little hover ad on the front page. You can unsubscribe any time and there's no email sharing over here - strictly for us obsessive jazzbos!

Also - any ideas for articles etc please post here I'll see what I can do.

Chris
_________________
http://www.playjazzguitar.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum Index -> Hangout, Chat & Get to Know All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group