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The Continuous Scale Exercise
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Topseli



Joined: 21 Jun 2010
Posts: 4
Location: Finland

PostPosted: Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:55 pm    Post subject: The Continuous Scale Exercise Reply with quote

Hi all!

This is my first post on PlayJazzGuitar forum.

So can you experienced jazz cats tell me did you do this? (The Continuous Scale Exercise) and if so, how long did it take to really master it?

I've been practicing this for a long time and still it seems I can't do it well so
I thought that some experiences about this type of exercise would get my motivation back to the higher level Rolling Eyes

Topseli
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JakeJew



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 2190
Location: Boston, MA

PostPosted: Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:17 pm    Post subject: Re: The Continuous Scale Exercise Reply with quote

Topseli wrote:
Hi all!

This is my first post on PlayJazzGuitar forum.

So can you experienced jazz cats tell me did you do this? (The Continuous Scale Exercise) and if so, how long did it take to really master it?

I've been practicing this for a long time and still it seems I can't do it well so
I thought that some experiences about this type of exercise would get my motivation back to the higher level Rolling Eyes

Topseli


Never heard of it. What it is?
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Topseli



Joined: 21 Jun 2010
Posts: 4
Location: Finland

PostPosted: Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Check it out in The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine
Page 120

It seems to me its a must have book so i assume you have it? Cool

Edit:

The exercise goes like this:

You pick a tune with some Alt, 7b9, etc chords and stat to ascend the scale for like 4 notes and then you move to the next chord and continue the ascending from where the last chord with the next chords scale and so on.

the book says this trains you to start the new scale wherever the last chord dropped you and teaches how to link scales together into a long flowing line

A bit clumsy explanation but thats the best i can do with my bad english Smile
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JakeJew



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 2190
Location: Boston, MA

PostPosted: Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Topseli wrote:
Check it out in The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine
Page 120

It seems to me its a must have book so i assume you have it? Cool

Edit:

The exercise goes like this:

You pick a tune with some Alt, 7b9, etc chords and stat to ascend the scale for like 4 notes and then you move to the next chord and continue the ascending from where the last chord with the next chords scale and so on.

the book says this trains you to start the new scale wherever the last chord dropped you and teaches how to link scales together into a long flowing line

A bit clumsy explanation but thats the best i can do with my bad english Smile


Oh that! Yeah I actually do that as a warm up often for a tough tune. I got it from a friend who got it from a friend who I guess got it from Kurt Rosenwinkel.

Great exercise. How hard it is is entirely tempo dependent. I can't burn it or anything...

Also good to try this on just one scale, or in just one position, or using the entire range of the instrument, from low E to your highest note. Or try it all in 11th position or something...great exercise.
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Topseli



Joined: 21 Jun 2010
Posts: 4
Location: Finland

PostPosted: Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah. Thanks for replies Smile

My teacher showed me this ex awhile ago with stella. He did it with 8th notes with metronome on like 90 and i've practiced this alot but quarter notes on tempo 60 is too much for me... guess i need to get back to the shed
Wink
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planetguy



Joined: 11 Dec 2008
Posts: 284

PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

on a related note (pun not intended) another thing i like to do is take a chord progression from a tune...let's say autumn leaves in Em and then divide the fingerboard into a small zone.

let's say from the open low E string to the 5th fret of the high E string.

and remember in this ex. you don't go above the 5th fret but instead turn back down for the next avail chord tone.

you the play arpeggios through the changes using only chord tones.

so....the first chord once you're into the changes is Am7.

Am7 you'd start up from that low E string w E G A C

then continue up w D F# A C for the D7th....

then continue up for the GM7 w D F# G (back down to) F#

then continuing back down you start your CM7 on the E of the B string etc, etc.


this is a great way to learn tunes and it also helps you see different qualities of chords starting on every different inversion!


for extra points you can also concoct different parameters/boundaries. say....from the fifth fret to the the eight fret.....or even using the whole length of the neck but only the bottom four strings, or.....


hope that makes some sense. Wink
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Jens



Joined: 20 Feb 2007
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Location: The Hague, The Netherlands

PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 2010 2:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it is a great exercise. You should by the way try it not only with scales but also diatonic arps/triads or 3rds etc.
I still use it quite often.

Jens
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Topseli



Joined: 21 Jun 2010
Posts: 4
Location: Finland

PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers!

Thanks for your replies!

I got many new practicing ideas from them and now I'm back in that ''drive'' to practice more and more!

Thanks again Smile
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Jens



Joined: 20 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you find it hard to do on a tune then maybe start out with a simple progression, so that you have to think less about chords and where you are in a 32 bar tune and more about changing and keeping time.
I really think that helps getting in to the flow and feeling the barline. Something like: Imaj7 VI7alt IIm7 F7 alt or maybe Cm7 F7alt Bbm7 Eb7alt Abm etc.. Bmaj7 D7 Gmaj7 Bb7 Ebmaj7 Gb7. In the beginning it is probably easier to keep track if the scales are quite different sounding, so not too many common notes.

Jens
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chrisj



Joined: 03 Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Location: Los Angeles

PostPosted: Thu Jul 22, 2010 3:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Similar to the first post, you could play a 1-2-3-5 arp over each chord and sound like Coletrane.

Half way down the page:
http://chrisjuergensen.com/arpeggios.htm
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ed norton



Joined: 03 Nov 2005
Posts: 762

PostPosted: Thu Jul 22, 2010 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's Coltrane...........go Cole Hamels!

Last edited by ed norton on Thu Jul 22, 2010 1:45 pm; edited 1 time in total
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JakeJew



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 22, 2010 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mmmm Colslaw.
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ed norton



Joined: 03 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 22, 2010 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mmmmm
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chrisj



Joined: 03 Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Location: Los Angeles

PostPosted: Thu Jul 22, 2010 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Err.. I meant Cole Porter...
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M



Joined: 02 Jan 2009
Posts: 331
Location: Northern VA (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 2010 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Coal Miner (or Minor?)
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