PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum Index PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum
Jazz Guitar Discussion
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

psychology of keys
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum Index -> The Polling Place
View previous topic :: View next topic  

does key affect a song's mood?
yes
76%
 76%  [ 32 ]
no
23%
 23%  [ 10 ]
Total Votes : 42

Author Message
johnomania



Joined: 27 Mar 2006
Posts: 58

PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 2006 2:39 am    Post subject: psychology of keys Reply with quote

so i've been in a huge argument with my peers at school about whether or not the key of a song changes the mood. when i say key, i mean like A major vs. Bb major, not A major vs. A minor. they believe in the idea that certain keys are sadder than others, etc. one of my teachers agrees with me and thinks it's bs, and another said certain frequencies evoke certain emotions in the brain. the opposing argument said "if you play something then capo it up, it has a different mood because it's a different key" when i believe that they just think that because of the timbre of the note changes and the string tension changes and what not. any opinions?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
alfonso



Joined: 25 May 2005
Posts: 1258
Location: Sacramento

PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 2006 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think keys do have different mood changing effects, this is a tough question though it's just a belief, I don't have any basis in fact to reflect on but you say yourself that your not talking about major against minor so you do know sad songs are mostly written in minor keys. So taking that in mind why wouldn't key changes, change the mood? Or how about this, why are so many blues songs written the key of Bb or F? I don't know, maybe a musicoligist will answer the question. Is there such a word, musicoligist?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnomania



Joined: 27 Mar 2006
Posts: 58

PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 2006 5:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alfonso wrote:
Or how about this, why are so many blues songs written the key of Bb or F? I don't know, maybe a musicoligist will answer the question. Is there such a word, musicoligist?


Bb and F are horn player keys the same way E and A are beginning rock guitarist keys. Horn players in concert bands tune to Bb's while string instruments in orchestras tune to A's.

But I think of this on piano. If I sat down and played a song in A then changed it to Bb, I think it's just the register and the resonance and stuff that is changing, which could also affect mood, but I don't see how D minor is a sadder key than E minor.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bjorn



Joined: 04 Jan 2005
Posts: 1037
Location: Denmark

PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2006 8:57 pm    Post subject: Re: psychology of keys Reply with quote

A very interesting post, which I actually just saw now.... Laughing

Quote:
one of my teachers agrees with me and thinks it's bs


I would not agree to this guy, and its amazing that this guy is a teacher..!

I mean, difference in timbres between keys is something we all, hopefully, know and have noticed exist.
Now, a further explanation on how this may be, I wouldnt be the person to come up with, but I believe that what might be more correct, is what this other teacher said...:

Quote:
and another said certain frequencies evoke certain emotions in the brain.


This for sure, and also the vibrations and resconance (spelling), in the wood of the instruments Guitar and Piano, and the vibrations in the electric part as well....
I just know that when I write music, (I dont compose in front of an instrument), I always try it in several keys to find what fits best, because there is a difference...

But Im very interested in other opinions on this, so lets take this up again...

Take care,

Bjørn
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
steve



Joined: 04 Jun 2005
Posts: 867
Location: oz

PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2006 4:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
, but I don't see how D minor is a sadder key than E minor



Of course not, because Em is far sadder than Dm!
_________________
Miles is the answer.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
draqza



Joined: 28 Dec 2004
Posts: 205

PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 11:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

steve wrote:
Quote:
, but I don't see how D minor is a sadder key than E minor



Of course not, because Em is far sadder than Dm!


Come on now, Dm is the saddest chord ever! Razz
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
Ian



Joined: 19 Jun 2006
Posts: 54
Location: Brisbane, Australia

PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For me, certain keys do have certain moods. Now it could be a scientific reason, or it could be that I associate certain keys with certain songs, or certain keys sound different on guitar due to limits of its range. But there are a few keys which for me have a very distinct mood. The stuff might not make sense to anyone but me, but here goes...


D major is the happiest key, it reminds me of a sunny spring day

Eb major is the next happiest, but somehow less innocent than D major, like it has a skeleton in it's closet so is not completely happy.

Bb major is also happy, but with a bluesy edge - a lot more worldy than Eb major

Ab major falls somewhere between Eb and Bb

A major is a bluesy key

E major is melancholy in a happy sort of way

A minor is the saddest key

D minor somehow is not really sad at all, but just "jazzy"

G minor is a little sad, but mostly funky

C minor is a no-nonsense key - lets just get on with the song and not get too emotional about it.

C major is a relaxing key
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
danielo



Joined: 21 Jun 2006
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2006 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that for sure a song changes a lot if we change the key. It is not the same to play a tune in Eb than to play it in C. And there are also certanin keys that sound better in a specific instrument that in another.

The reasons for these are both physical and phsycological, I guess, but you dont have to be a scientist to know that a tune is always gonna feel different depending on wich key you choose to use.

As a matter of fact, If you dont see the difference, really, do you want to continue to be a musician? hahaah, just kidding.
_________________
danielo
la vida es todo aquello que puede definirse mediante un conjunto no nulo de afirmaciones elementales
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
danielo



Joined: 21 Jun 2006
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a nice description of keys, i agree.
_________________
danielo
la vida es todo aquello que puede definirse mediante un conjunto no nulo de afirmaciones elementales
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rudi



Joined: 21 Aug 2006
Posts: 7
Location: Portsmouth England

PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2006 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I suppose I'm the only other dissenter here. I voted NO. Perhaps I am missing out then? Because I find the only differences after transposing to be technical ones.
_________________
I sometimes think, therefore I am intermittant
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Max



Joined: 20 Oct 2006
Posts: 46

PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i think in the old days of equal temperment, each key used to have a "color" to it, but nowadays the tuning has become very exactly equal, and the color of the keys has dissapeared. i don't think i've ever been able to tell a difference.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
steve



Joined: 04 Jun 2005
Posts: 867
Location: oz

PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2006 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try playing All Blues in Eb!
I just had to at a recent gig, and it's just wrong a tell ya!!
_________________
Miles is the answer.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Out to Lunch



Joined: 06 Oct 2006
Posts: 155

PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2006 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd have to go with a no. I have perfect pitch, and for me, the only distinction between keys is how far away they are from eachother. (A song played in a different key may sound 'higher' or 'lower')

I recently got in an argument with someone who insisted that Eb sounded mellow and cool in comparison to say Db. So I played a Joe Pass lick in both keys, and he said the second one sounded more mellow. But it was the one based in Db. I'm assuming it sounded more mellow because it was the same thing a whole step lower.

I believe that is the only difference in 'emotion'. A key played higher up on the neck might sound different to a key a few steps lower. But then you'd have to think about octaves: Do the keys sound the same depending on which octave range it is?

It can be very pleasant to play a tune you know in a different key. It does feel like a whole new sound, since your ears aren't used to it. But after a while it all seems the same, imo.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hanni



Joined: 01 Sep 2006
Posts: 660
Location: germany

PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2006 3:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, thats an interesting dialog, i try to found out the same thing and compare jazz songs with german church songs, some songs have the same structure, i don´t know why and i have no answer, i want to found this out it seems to be interesting. Laughing Hanni
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Smokey



Joined: 26 Nov 2006
Posts: 93
Location: Tuscon, AZ

PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 4:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One would have to seperate the effect of the instrument from the effect of the pitches themselves, at least IMO. I can't think of anything about a pitch or a scale based on a certain key that would alter its feel or mood. They are just pitches measured in the manner that our culture chooses to measure music. Certain instruments favor certain tones (horns love "flat keys") but that is inherent in their design.

One other factor is that even non-musicians tend to remember the key they are accustomed to hearing a certain song played in. Years ago a study was done where people off of the street were asked to sing a line from a popular song. In a majority of cases they sang in the key that the song was usually played in. I suspect this is just memory at work.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PlayJazzGuitar.com Forum Index -> The Polling Place All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group